List of Projects that have been completed by the chapter.

Our chapter has made many contributions to Danville. The UDC was instrumental in saving “The Last Capital of the Confederacy”, the old Sutherlin Mansion. President Jefferson Davis stayed here April 3-10, 1865 when he and his cabinet evacuated Richmond. The last full cabinet Meeting was held here and this is where Davis received news of Lee’s surrender. When Mrs. Sutherlin died in 1912, the home was threatened with demolition. The Daughters raised $20,000, half of the funds required, which were matched by the City of Danville. In 1912, the City deeded to the UDC two upstairs rooms in the mansion for a meeting place in appreciation of their work in saving the building. A wall was removed to make one large room which the chapter continues to use for its meetings.

In addition to saving the Sutherlin Mansion and erecting a monument on the grounds to Southern Women and Anne Eliza Johns, the chapter donated funds for the monument erected in 1921 in memory of Mayor Harry Wooding, also a Confederate veteran, which stands in front of the Municipal Building.

The Chapter assisted in the dedication of the Civil War Walking Tour at Green Hill Cemetery in 2008 that takes visitors to 15 sites and provides information about the Confederate Monument and prominent Confederate veterans. The chapter and members provided financial support for the printing of the walking tour brochures.

The Chapter is also active in maintaining the Confederate Soldiers Monument and the graves of Confederate soldiers located in Green hill Cemetery. The monument, a 16-ton obelisk and base of Virginia granite, stands 32 feet atop a six-foot artificial mound. It was dedicated September 3, 1878, and paid for with $2,000 raised by the Ladies Memorial Association which was a forerunner of the UDC.

A Memorial to Southern Women stands on the lawn of the Sutherlin Mansion, the Last Capitol of the Confederacy, now the Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History. The original monument, erected by the UDC led by Mrs. Custis Lee Bolling, has a plaque that reads: Erected to the memory of the women of the Southern Confederacy 1861-1865 by their descendants Danville Virginia 1927. When first built, a sculpted granite bust of a woman was on the monument but it was deemed unattractive and the bust was destroyed leaving the memorial and plaque. A memorial plaque to Anne Eliza Johns was added on the back of the monument by our chapter in 2007 led by Mrs. Phyllis Stroud. The plaque to our namesake pays tribute to her work as a nurse, teacher, and author but especially to her ministry to the Confederate soldiers and Union prisoners in the hospitals in Danville during the War Between the States. Both the women of the Southern Confederacy and our name sake are honored with this monument and the two plaques at this historic site.

Save the Sutherlin Mansion

Confederate Soldiers Monument

Civil War Walking Tour at Green Hill Cemetery

Mayor Wooding Statue

Memorial to Southern Women

Past Project List

Chapter Name: Anne Eliza Johns  Virginia Division

This Memorial plaque to Anne Eliza Johns was added to the back of the monument by our chapter in 2007 led by Mrs. Phyllis Stroud. The plaque to our namesake pays tribute to her work as a nurse, teacher, and author but especially to her ministry to the Confederate soldiers and Union prisoners in the hospitals in Danville during the war between the states.

Memorial Plaque to Anne Eliza Johns

The Ladies Memorial Association was founded by Miss Augusta Yates in 1872. She and her sister Mrs. Mary Ella Aiken both served as President during the years that the Association was active. Miss Yates wrote the history of the organization and led the group until her death. She started works that are carried on by our chapter today. In 2010, we placed a footstone on Augusta Yates grave with the correct spelling of her name and identifying her as the founder of the Ladies Memorial Association.

Miss Augusta Yates

The founder of the chapter was Mrs. Berryman (Nellie Rives) Green, a Real Daughter, who also served as the President for the first 20 years. Berryman and Nellie Green are buried in Green Hill Cemetery. On June 7th, 2009, the chapter placed a Real Daughter marker and a member marker on her grave.

Mrs. Nellie Rives Green

On Tuesday, November 1, 2011, the Anne Eliza Johns Chapter and the Wednesday Club met at the Confederate Monument in Greenhill Cemetery to dedicate two benches to Miss Anne Eliza Johns and Miss Augusta Yates. Anne was recognized for being a nurse to soldiers in the Confederate hospitals, Author, Teacher and Namesake of our Chapter. Augusta was recognized for being the founder of the Ladies Memorial Association, the Wednesday Club, and the Shakespeare Club.

Benches to southern Woman